Connecting Social Capital, Cognitive Bias, and Entrepreneurial Intentions: About Gender Differences

  • Lin Ju Cheng
  • Chun Chieh Liao
Keywords: Entrepreneuriship, Social capital, Optimism, Overconfidence, Entrepreneurial intentions

Abstract

This study combines the SC-E model and entrepreneurial bias research to formulate a “social capital-cognitive bias-entrepreneurial intentions framework,” and to discuss the differences between gender in the relationship among social capital, cognitive bias, and entrepreneurial intentions. Additionally, it also explores the mediation effects of optimism and overconfidence. Structural equation modeling is used to examine the hypotheses on a sample of 511 students at a Taiwanese university. Empirical results show that neither bonding nor bridging social capital has a direct impact on entrepreneurial intentions. They also indicate that male students are more optimistic and have higher entrepreneurial intentions than females. Regarding the mediation effect, bridging social capital may evoke both optimism and overconfidence, but bonding social capital only affects optimism. Furthermore, optimism is the antecedent of overconfidence, and it creates another channel of the mediation effect.

Author Biographies

Lin Ju Cheng
Dr. Lin-Ju Cheng is an assistant professor of the Department of Marketing and Logistics Management, St. John's University. Her current research interests include innovation and entrepreneurship, strategy management, and business management.
Chun Chieh Liao
Dr. Chun-Chieh Liao (Corresponding author) is an assistant professor of the Department of International Trade, Chinese Culture University. His current research interests include business management, financial management, and innovation and entrepreneurship management.
Published
2020-04-07
How to Cite
Cheng, L., & Liao, C. (2020). Connecting Social Capital, Cognitive Bias, and Entrepreneurial Intentions: About Gender Differences. Contemporary Management Research, 16(1), 1-34. https://doi.org/10.7903/cmr.19818
Section
10: Other contemporary management issues