The influence of service recovery on perceived justice under different involvement level-an evidence of retail industry

Hong-sheng Chang, Ju-Chun Lee, Chien-Ming Tseng

Abstract


The purpose of this work is to elucidate how service recovery and perceived justice are related, and explores the modulation effect of involvement level and subculture in this relationship. Samples were collected using the questionnaire, which had been assessed the quality of our measurement efforts by investigating reliability and validity. Under high involvement level, perceived justice is found to be affected mainly by atonement and empowerment, whereas communication, feedback, explanation and tangibles influence perceived justice under low involvement level. Moreover, under city subculture, perceived justice is found to be affected mainly by communication, feedback, explanation and empowerment. Furthermore, under country subculture, perceived justice is found to be affected mainly by atonement and tangibles. Finally, for three dimensions of perceived justice, under high involvement level, distributive justice is found to be affected by service recovery, whereas service recovery influence interactive justice under low involvement. Under city subculture, processing justice is found to be affected by service recovery, whereas service recovery influence distributive justice. For future research, other modulation effect of service recovery may influence perception of perceived justice should be discussed. In practice, hotel managers can hone the relevant variables to raise the effect of service recovery on perceived justice. Finally, this study provides a new shape of the “structural” relationships among involvement, subculture and three perceived justices.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7903/cmr.722

Contemporary Management Research / CMR / ISSN 1813-5498