Mothers’ Perceived Vulnerability, Perceived Threat, and Intention to Administer Preventive Medication to Their Children

Phuong Nguyen

Abstract


The present research addressed whether mothers’ perception that their children are vulnerable to and threatened by a certain health problem increases their intention to use over-the-counter (OTC) medications to prevent it. The research aimed to examine the predictive validity and the moderating effects of perceived vulnerability and perceived threat on mothers’ intention to administer over-the-counter preventive medications to their school-aged children. Derived from social cognition models, a causal model was developed and tested with data collected from 299 mothers in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, regarding the vitamin supplement category. The model was found to significantly predict mothers’ intention to use OTC medications. Perceived vulnerability and perceived threat did not predict intention but moderated the relationship between perceived benefit and intention to administer vitamin supplements. Theoretical and managerial implications and limitations of the research are also discussed.

Keywords: Intention, Perceived vulnerability, Perceived threat, Vitamin supplement

To cite this document: Phuong Nguyen, "Mothers’ Perceived Vulnerability, Perceived Threat, and Intention to Administer Preventive Medication to Their Children", Contemporary Management Research, Vol.9, No.4, pp.399-418, 2013.

Permanent link to this document:
http://dx.doi.org/10.7903/cmr.11093

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7903/cmr.11093

Contemporary Management Research / CMR / ISSN 1813-5498